“I discovered that there’s nothing to be ashamed of being a Brony”

Posted by on Jul 02, 2012 at 2:41 pm
bronycon

We may to break it gently to this weirdo. Yes, you should be ashamed, you friggin’ wackjob.

Dale Fjordbotten is a proud “My Little Pony” fan, with the shiny blue body suit and yellow lightning bolt, blue wings and blue tail to prove it.

Like many “Bronies” — boys and men who like the cartoon “My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic”— the 25-year-old college student turned out over the weekend for “BronyCon Summer 2012” at the Meadowlands Exposition Center, which drew 4,000 men, women, boys and girls, many in colorful wigs and costumes.

“I thought about what people would say. ‘It’s creepy. It’s weird. It’s a … show for little girls,'” said Fjordbotten, from Staten Island, N.Y. “It’s just a great show … the story line, the plot, the beautiful animation.”

Bronies say they’re a misunderstood lot who’ve gotten a bad rap from the media. They’re all about the show, friendship, love and tolerance, and they have no bad intentions, they say.

“I discovered that there’s nothing to be ashamed of being a Brony,” said 19-year-old James Penna of Mastic in Long Island, N.Y. “People are into what they’re into.”

Outside the convention center, young men danced and sang along with songs from My Little Pony cartoon that blasted from loud speakers as a video screen on a large truck showed the show’s characters. One observer said it almost felt like a Grateful Dead concert.

Oh sure, just like a Dead show, except without the Deadheads and lots of acid. In case you’re new to Bronies,  the great Kurt Schlichter has some background.

As sickening as it is, we can’t just ban grown men from acting like idiots because we disapprove of their lifestyle choices – after all, we aren’t progressives. It’s still a free country – coincidentally due entirely to the efforts of men and women who put aside childish things to contribute to society instead of feeding at the trough and then sitting on their expansive backsides as they eagerly clap like seals at the antics of colorful cartoon steeds.

If these losers want to waste their lives lingering in a childhood fugue state, Hollywood has every right to serve them up more of the same cultural slop and pocket the cash proceeds. But it shouldn’t.

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12 Responses to ““I discovered that there’s nothing to be ashamed of being a Brony””

  1. Captain Whitebread on 2/02/12 at 2:44 pm

    Now I don’t feel so bad about being a Trekkie. There IS something worse.

  2. Blue Hen on 2/02/12 at 2:46 pm

    except without the Deadheads and lots of acid.

    Based upon that photograph, I would have to disagree with you on the second point.

  3. mja on 2/02/12 at 4:03 pm

    Stuff like this always infuriates me. Rather than trying to understand or saying nothing, it’s like conservatives can’t help themselves but mindlessly knee jerk and act like a progressive’s stereotype on this. These are people we could be convincing of conservative ideals but instead they will never look at anything from fox, or Bill Whittle, or the Big sites, and now jwf because people who typically could be relied for well thought out points or analysis insist on making colossal asses of themselves based on little data and poorly written articles.

    Seriously, conservatives of all people should know what it feels like to have people make rush judgements about us based on assumptions (how often have conservatives been labelled as racist or heartless for no more reason than because they are conservatives?)

    Articles like this make me not want to self-identify as a conservative.

  4. EBL on 2/02/12 at 5:01 pm

    They must be perversely drawn to the negative attention this generates.

    But mja, if the future of conservatism relies on keeping Bronies appeased, we are truly screwed. I am moving up to that off the grid cabin in the mountains and waiting for the end times.

  5. EBL on 2/02/12 at 5:04 pm

    And I agree it is better to ignore this nonsense, except on a personal level to make sure any “Brony” is not part of your life (especially if you have kids).

  6. James Felix on 2/02/12 at 5:05 pm

    “It’s still a free country – coincidentally due entirely to the efforts of men and women who put aside childish things to contribute to society instead of feeding at the trough and then sitting on their expansive backsides as they eagerly clap like seals at the antics of colorful cartoon steeds.”

    And this is substantively different from spending hours watching sports and memorizing useless statistics… how, exactly? I mean besides the fact that cartoon fans don’t riot at the drop of a hat.

    They’re passionately into something you don’t like. How does that justify the assumption that they don’t contribute to society?

    I’m a 45 year old man who still has almost every comic I’ve ever bought, with a collection of about 25k issues. I also love the related movies and cartoons and have a good sized collection of memorabilia. I pay for my collection using money I get from my six-figure income as a financial advisor, and I’m a veteran of the US Navy. I think I contribute a lot more to society than some jackass scribbling opinions on a website, despite my love of “childish things”.

  7. Blue Hen on 2/02/12 at 5:06 pm

    mja: Articles like this make me not want to self-identify as a conservative.

    Lemme guess; you’re Concerned and Christian too?

  8. EBL on 2/02/12 at 7:59 pm

    James Felix: If a Brony lifestyle makes you happy (I am not sure if you are into it or just defending it in general), good for you. Your post is full of a bunch of strange and incorrect assumptions about bloggers, but I no doubt have false assumptions about you. I am certainly not anti comic book or anti cartoon, I just find it strange that grown men would be into My Little Pony. But that is me. Of course, you have some prejudicial views too. But it is all good.

    Thank you for your service in the Navy. You should consider blogging about your collection. If you are that passionate about it, why not write and post about it.

  9. TheLastBrainLeft on 2/02/12 at 11:13 pm

    I like the show. I hate these autistic fanboys. Don’t assume everyone who likes the show is like this.

  10. Mia on 3/03/12 at 11:06 am

    It’s a shame you don’t actually bother to try to understand what these guys (and others) are doing. It’s not necessarily as bad as that, and in some respects is a cut above other “pass times” and interests. As a matter of fact, there are lots of fan cons around on all sorts of topics which attract all types of people, all ages, all genders. I’ve started going to them out of curiosity, because they come to most cities around the world. Sometimes I like what they are doing, sometimes I’m not feeling it, but it’s always a total scream and fascinating to participate in even as an observer. I have to say I’m enchanted.

    Some of the cons revolve around anime, a particular video game, Star Wars, sci fi, comic books, dressing in animal costumes, steampunk and more. I haven’t discovered them all, but many of them have very intellectual programming for days on end and encourage fan involvement on the creative side. Some of the fans are very talented writers, illustrators, costumers. Some of the topics I’ve seen at recent cons include things like writing puppetry shows, classical Japanese, industry insiders talking on various technical topics, and just more meet and greet people with other niche interests (like people who like dressing as rats at the one con I attended). They sponsor talent shows, costume contests, live bands and dances, video editing or writing contests. One local con had a musician who liked to play his music dressed as a tiger.

    There’s a lot more to it than just being “childish”. I saw one grandfather come to a con dressed with his granddaughter and friends as “Powder Puff Girls” characters, which was pretty cool. So somehow it’s more “adult” to be dropping acid at Grateful Dead concerts and the like? We all have to be sleazy or boring now that we’re adults? I second James Felix and mja above. Check out a local con for yourself and see how interesting and fun it is even on the fringes of fandom.

  11. Luke on 7/07/12 at 3:53 pm

    “To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.”
    ― C.S. Lewis