Don’t Worry, FEMA’s on the Job

Posted by on Nov 08, 2012 at 8:20 am
femacenter

Sure, it’s not as if these folks aren’t used to inclement weather conditions or anything.

Looks as if FEMA is just a fair- weather friend.

Yesterday’s nor’easter proved too much for the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s aid location in Tottenville, SI — which hung a sign reading “Closed due to weather” as the wintery storm blew into town.

Who knows, one of these years even the president may be held accountable for FEMA’s incompetence. Meanwhile, 10 days after Sandy large parts of New York and New Jersey remain without power. But at least most people think the president did a great job, and that’s all that matters.

 

Tags:

22 Responses to “Don’t Worry, FEMA’s on the Job”

  1. steveegg on 8/08/12 at 8:32 am

    Since that FEMA office isn’t in a trailer, the only way that closing could be justified is if it was in danger of being swamped. Something tells me that isn’t the case.

    Don’t worry; your neighbors are blaming a President for their plight. On second thought – worry because they’re blaming someone who hasn’t been in office for almost 4 years.

  2. John P. Squibob on 8/08/12 at 11:06 am

    Silly people, what really matters is that Christie got to talk to Bruce Springsteen.

  3. jsallison on 8/08/12 at 12:22 pm

    Well they’re already paying them per diem and lodging, you don’t really expect them to pay overtime, too, do ya? They’ll be getting paid for weather closures, too. Ain’t it grand?

  4. rri2012 on 8/08/12 at 12:54 pm

    The election’s over people and FEMA is no longer on the ballot. Plus the voters have decided that performance, showing up and taking responsibility is over-rated. So FEMA can rest for 4 more years — too bad Staten Island; you’ll just have to wait for individuals who are not on govt dole to help out.

  5. Bill on 8/08/12 at 2:30 pm

    Part of the issue here is that we have removed the resources farther and farther from local control.

    If you’ve been around long enough you will remember when disaster response was a local and state responsibility (i.e., the old Civil Defense, the National Guard, and similar). I don’t know that moving it up the bureaucracy has produced notably better results, but the costs are surely greater.

    When the money comes from Washington, so do decision makers, and the folks with knowledge of local needs and conditions are seldom far enough in the loop to have meaningful input.

    FEMA was, I believe, a mistake, and we’re paying the price every time nature turns around and bites us.

  6. el polacko on 8/08/12 at 4:05 pm

    so…you’re telling me that romney was right all along ? well whaddaya know. guess ‘we’ elected the wrong guy. oopsie.

  7. werewife on 8/08/12 at 4:24 pm

    Bill nails it. While I was growing up, every US history textbook I was given in school, from single-digit grades up to college, told the same story: A powerful, centralized national government was the citizen’s best friend, always working to protect and extend the individual’s rights. The more centralized an endeavor at the national level, the more successful it was sure to be. It took me until my middle twenties to unlearn this. A liberal can be defined as someone who never unlearns it.

  8. Niedermeyer's Dead Horse on 8/08/12 at 6:35 pm

    Yeah, uhhhh

    Wait.

    Who hung the sign on the door?

    Either they determined, in advance of the storm, to close the office or the weather permitted someone to make it there just to hang the sign.

    If the former, who chose to put the office in a vulnerable location? If the latter, if they could make it to the office, they could have stayed there.

    My Red Cross certification required acknowledgment that I might well have to camp out during a crisis but, I suppose, FEMA folks rise above such humble commitments.

  9. Mkelley on 8/08/12 at 7:18 pm

    Washington is good at creating massive, incoherent bureaucracies that totally forget their original intent and do more harm than good-just look at Homeland Security, the Department of Energy, and the Department of Education, just to name a few.